The City of Sonora will unveil potential locations for a bus stop with a transit shelter either on South Washington Street or Stockton Road at a community meeting on Monday to gather public input on the $1.8 million Vision Sonora project.

Rachelle Kellogg, community development director for the city, said city staff and consultants working on the project will be at City Hall from 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m Monday to explain the proposed options.

People will be able to vote on their preferred location and design for the transit shelter at the meeting. Those who can’t attend will be able to view the information and provide input at City Hall or on the city’s website ( www.sonoraca.com ) through July 31.

Both options will also include changes to the existing signal at South Washington Street and Stockton Road, as well as pedestrian and landscaping improvements along the streets in the vicinity of the intersection.

Kellogg said the proposed options were not available for preview on Friday because they were still being worked on by consultants Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc., a national planning, design and engineering firm based in North Carolina that was awarded a nearly $270,000 contract for the work by the Sonora City Council in June.

Dubbed the “Stockton-Washington Corridor - Downtown Transit and Accessibility Improvement Project,” it is one of three projects originally proposed in the Vision Sonora Plan that are currently under development.

Funding for the project comes largely from money set aside for transit projects in Proposition 1B, a $20 billion bond measure approved by California voters in 2006, while other sources include the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program and the State Transportation Improvement Program.

The Tuolumne County Transportation Council is working in conjunction with the city to provide the funding.

Kellogg said a preferred location and design for the transit shelter based on the input received from the public through the end of the month will be presented to the council for possible approval at a public meeting on Aug. 6.

If approved at the Aug. 6 meeting, Kellogg said the city hopes to complete the design and engineering phase by the end of January and start construction sometime later in the year after getting the green light from Caltrans to move forward.

Darin Grossi, executive director of the TCTC and Tuolumne County Transit Agency, said the stop will be used by the county’s regular bus service, trolley service, summer service to Pinecrest, the Dodge Ridge Ski Bus in winter, and the Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System.

This project was one of many proposed originally in the Vision Sonora Plan that was adopted by the council in late 2013.

It’s not to be confused with two other Vision Sonora projects that are also in the works, one to reconfigure the intersection at the Red Church and another to create bulb-outs and flashing crosswalks at intersections along Washington Street from the church to Stockton Road.

The design and engineering phase on the $722,000 intersection project near the Red Church is in progress and must be completed by May of next year, while the TCTC plans to submit an application by the end of the month for a $810,000 grant through Caltrans to complete the Washington Street pedestrian improvements project.

Contact Alex MacLean at amaclean@uniondemocrat.com or (209) 588-4530.





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