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On pot, kindness, water and McClintock


Bravos

Reprieve — The Calaveras County Board of Supervisors took a collective breath this past week. Despite the furor from some quarters to send all pot growers packing, the supervisors extended the urgency ordinance that allowed pot cultivation in the first place. Of most importance to Calaveras County government and its people is enough time to find a way out of the mess they’ve created. It’s likely not everyone will be happy with the outcome. But wise leaders take the time necessary to figure out a way to be fair. Sometimes it’s not one side or the other that’s right. Sometimes there’s a third side. Let’s hope the supervisors use this time wisely.

Kindness — One of the cutest pictures we ran this week was of a group of children from Mark Twain Elementary in Angels Camp holding signs about kindness. It was particularly moving after reading any number of Facebook posts that were anything but kind. Kindness seems out of favor these days, at least in the world of public opinion. Kindness is an annual event in Angels Camp, where the city leaders have created a kindness zone every February since 1995. That was the same year the nonprofit Random Acts of Kindness Foundation was created in Denver. On its website the organization says, “Ultimately, we’re here for the kind-hearted do-gooders who are looking to spread kindness where they can.” The organization has 50 suggestions. Here are the top three: Pay it backward — buy coffee for the person behind you in line; compliment the first three people you talk to today; and send a positive text message to five different people right now. Let’s see how we in the Mother Lode can do. Send your acts of kindness or a random act someone did for you to lriddle@uniondemocrat.com.

Togetherness — No matter your politics, you should give credit to U.S. Rep. Tom McClintock for following through with his plans for a Town Hall meeting at 6 p.m. Wednesday at Sonora High. He knows he is about to face a group of people who vehemently disagree with his politics, his actions and his support for President Trump. Some of his Washington colleagues have chosen not to hold Town Hall meetings in the face of such dissension. One congressman from Illinois held his Town Hall by phone. To be fair, this is how U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam usually holds Town Hall meetings. He told an Illinois radio station, “Town hall meetings tend to be platforms for people to shout at one another and get angry at one another and leave more upset and disappointed and bent out of shape than when people came.” Let’s hope Sonora can show it doesn’t have to be that way.

Water — Tuolumne Utilities District was proactive in ensuring public safety at Lakewood Park Lake this week when runoff from Sullivan Creek watershed above Lakewood Park subdivision damaged a spillway. TUD said there was a possibility people, property and livestock below the dam could be in danger. With yet another storm system on its way, the TUD board issued an emergency order to remove the spillway and drain the lake. Project completed just in time.